What are Botnets and How do They Work?

What are Botnets and How do They Work?

What are Botnets and How do They Work?

In October 2016, the Mirai botnet unleashed a massive DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack on the US east coast. The creators, a bunch of university students, initially targeted vulnerable IoT devices to create a powerful botnet. But with the code being posted online, other criminal minds are already at work building and modifying the code for bigger and more dangerous attacks. So, what are botnets and how do they work? Our cybersecurity experts answer.

What are botnets?

A botnet is a network of internet-connected devices or bots. When these bots are infected with malicious codes, they are sometimes referred to as zombies. A botnet usually consists of hundreds of thousands of infected computers and devices that hackers control remotely. A botnet can consist of not just computers, but any device that is connected to the Internet. The Mirai botnet used unsecured IoT devices. The botnet is then used to carry out large scale malicious attacks.

How do botnets work?

Your computer can be directly hacked, or you can be tricked into clicking and downloading malicious code from emails or malicious websites. Once infected, the device delivers the message to the hacker or botnet herder. Your computer or device is now a part of the botnet. The worst part is all this happens without you being aware that your system is infected. The only indication can be a slowing down of your system.

Criminals use botnets to

  • Primarily to carry out DDoS attacks.
  • Send spam emails to millions of users. You may be surprised to know that your computer may be sending out spam to other users, without you even realising it.
  • Monitor your web activity and display banner ads targeted at you.
  • Create fake traffic to websites or online advertisements.

How can you protect your devices from botnet attacks?

What are botnets | How do They Work? | Computing Australia

A bot infection can be extremely hard to detect as it uses little bandwidth on an individual computer. Botnets increasingly use IoT devices as they are highly vulnerable and less secured than computers. However, the following steps can help you keep your devices secured from becoming zombies.

Jargon Buster

loT – Internet of Things – a collective term to describe physical objects that connect to the Internet. IoT devices generally mean devices that usually are not expected to have an internet connection, like smart security systems, fitness trackers or smart refrigerators. 
DDos attack – Distributed Denial of Service attacks are a form of cyberattack where a server is overwhelmed by more traffic than it can handle and shuts down.

Blake Parry | Blog author | Computing Australia

Blake Parry

Blake is the Technical Services Manager of The Computing Australia Group, he is responsible for coordinating a team of technicians to deliver IT services to our valued clients. He works with a diverse client portfolio spanning mining, oil & gas, manufacturing, government, and corporate sectors. It is challenging because no two clients and no two sectors have the same IT environment. The team at CAG is committed to documentation and we spend a lot of time ensuring that each site is documented to the highest standard.

Blake Parry | Blog author | Computing Australia

Blake Parry

Blake is the Technical Services Manager of The Computing Australia Group, he is responsible for coordinating a team of technicians to deliver IT services to our valued clients. He works with a diverse client portfolio spanning mining, oil & gas, manufacturing, government, and corporate sectors. It is challenging because no two clients and no two sectors have the same IT environment. The team at CAG is committed to documentation and we spend a lot of time ensuring that each site is documented to the highest standard.

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